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Hi Folks

Have you heard the rumour? We’re moving…

coast-cartoon-2

Not sure if you’ve heard it through the grapevine but Coast is moving location on March 27th 2017 – don’t panic it’s only a few blocks up the road to Third Avenue.

The lease on the location that Coast is presently occupying expires in April ’17 and after 12 years of running a demanding clinic I have decided to simplify my life and so Coast is down sizing to just me!

Do not worry about losing contact with any of your trusted practitioners, we will not let that happen. Just ask them where they will be practicing from on your next appointment. Even once we have closed the doors on Church Road, you will be able to obtain your practitioners contact details, via a link page on Coast website.

You will also continue seeing our excellent Reception Staff as they are all following to our new location(YIPPEE).

Coast has attracted a plethora of good people that have walked through the clinic door looking for help with varied physical complaints; mainly local to Brighton and Hove but also from many parts of Britain and other countries. You are a generous bunch, sharing your knowledge and life experiences which I never cease to learn from. Thank you. You are the reason I love my job.

It has also been my pleasure and privilege to work with some amazing practitioners and staff at Coast (past and present) and together we have pulled together to aid our patients/clients in the way that would serve them best. Whether that was bio-mechanical techniques, exercise, suggested lifestyle changes to diet, postural habits, relaxation advice, or listen to something they needed to voice to get greater clarity in their lives. I look forward to continuing and further improving that service in our new location.

Our last day of practice on Church Road will be Saturday, March 25th 2017. My first day of practice in our new location will be Tuesday, March 28th 2017.

The new Coast location is in a suite in a hotel. Different, I know, but is is going to work really well for you (and me). It’s a great location with plenty of street parking as it is on Third Avenue which is one of those beautiful roads leading down to the seafront from Hove Town Hall, with 4 lanes of meter parking available.

Please take note of our new address: COAST CHIROPRACTIC  Regent Suit 3, Langford Hotel, Third Avenue, Hove, BN3 2PX

I would like to thank all of the staff for being so understanding and supportive and I look forward to working with you all, in one form or another in the future.

So, if I don’t see you before March 28th, then I will see you in Coasts new set-up. EXCITING!

Warmest regards, Anne French

You probably started some kind of lifestyle clean-up in January but possibly ran out of steam. Don’t be hard on yourself. January isn’t the best time to try detoxing as it is a time when the body needs lots of warming, hearty foods. The best time to start detoxing is around the Spring Equinox (March 20Th this year), which is the first official day of spring.

Spring is a time of renewal; just as nature wakes up and starts to blossom so do our bodies biorhythms come out of winter hibernation making it a powerful time to cleanse/detox your body.

springgrowth

Don’t groan – this doesn’t have to be a painful process. It will, however, leave you feeling invigorated and (truly) full of the joys of spring as well as looking better/fresher.

People seem to be unsure on how to detox correctly so last year I taught a 4 week Detox Class for those wanting support and information to go through the process at whatever level they wanted to, whether that was to just clean up a bit or deeply detox with the ‘how to’ plus importantly the ‘why to’. I loved doing it so have decided to teach another course this year.

Who needs to detox?

Quite simply, who doesn’t? Our bodies are in contact with toxins constantly whether it be by air, skin, food as well as mentally stressful situations that further stress our bodies. Studies have shown that years of subtle but consistent toxin exposure results in toxin accumulation in our fat cells. So, in reality, everyone would benefit from giving their body a chemical holiday.

What to expect from the class

In this class you will learn about your body and what you can do to enhance your health, as well as importantly, understanding why it helps. Regardless at what level of detoxing you wish to hit; just clean up your lifestyle or a really deep spring clean of your body – it’s up to you. Your body is amazing, however, it needs the time and space to have a spring clean and here is the class that can help and inspire you to do just that!

Week 1

  • Learn how your body actually cleans itself – perfectly.
  • Get ready – both practically and mentally

Week 2

  • Menu samples and guidance.
  • You may have heard about ‘alkalising your body’. What does that really mean?

Week 3

  • How to boost the cleanse and improve your immune system
  • The importance of movement

Week 4

  • Living in the now.
  • Healthy mind, healthy body.

 

Cleaning up your lifestyle habits will probably result in a reduction in weight – a plus for most people. One thing that is guaranteed, you will look (hair, skin, nails) better as well as feel great. If you were a dog, you would have a wet nose!

4 week course

starting – Wednesday, March 18th, at 7.30pm

course fees – £40

Testimonial

Anne’s detox class was packed with information – and gave me a framework with a really helpful weekly ‘check in’ so that I could find my own pace, and tackle the challenges that came up for me – I finally understood that detoxing is about giving your system a break – physical, mental, informed and gentle – that supports your system to do what it does best! 

The detox course has given me the tools and inspiration to take control and see detoxing as a positive process towards greater vitality.

 

So, if this is for you, book your place on the class by calling calling the clinic: 01273 321133. Don’t wait until the inspiration has passed – you know you have wanted to do it for ages – here is the help you have been looking for.

Written by Anne French

It is Brighton Marathon time! We will be offering our usual FREE express road side massage and stretch aid to all Brighton Marathon runners on the day of the marathon.  We are perfectly placed along the course, just before mile 18.

Helen Grant, Physiotherapist and myself Anee French, Chiropractor, will be set up outside Coast Chiropractic at 198, Church Road.  Please come and see us if you’re struggling and hopefully we can help you get through the rest of the race.

We will also be available for post event treatments; we recommend a deep tissue massage or if you have an injury – chiropractic , osteopathy or physiotherapy. Just give us a call on 01273 321133.

GOOD LUCK – we will be cheering you on!

 

If you would like to look at any of our blogs on running – just click on any of the following:

Running injuries

Beginner, serious enthusiast or elite athlete?

An Athletes Relief Aid

My Little Runaway

Olympic Mindsets

Yoga stretches for runners (and everyone).

ITB Syndrome

Barefoot running

Barefoot running (part 2)

Due to the many questions and requests that came from my January Blog –  My Top Health Tip – I have decided to run a 4 week class on how to detox the body.

Start date: Wednesday, March 12th

Time: 7.30pm

Cost of course: £36.00

Obviously, juicing will be included along with lots of other information, tips and how to’s.

If this is something you would like to participant in – then give the clinic a ring to book your place. Spaces are limited so don’t hesitate for too long.

 

You may need a massage! Massage is a strategy that often gets overlooked when we’re talking about how to prevent running runners-injuriesinjuries and/or recovery. I, like many of you, am training for the Brighton Half Marathon. I want to share with you the direct effect that a Sports Massage can have on your body while training for and after a half or full marathon… The Benefits of a Sports Massage

  • Improves Circulation
  • Loosens Tight Muscles
  • Reduces Stress on Joints
  • Releases Tension and Rebalances the Musculoskeletal System
  • Decreases Recovery Time between Training Sessions
  • Identifies Areas of Tightness
  • Decreases Likelihood of Injuries
  • Maintains Flexibility and Pliability of Muscles
  • Maintains the Conditions of the Muscle Tissue –Encouraging Re-organisation of the Collagen in the Muscle
  • Decreases Stiffness After Increasing Mileage

I have found that these factors will directly improve the ability to train at a high level, therefore improving your overall performance. When should you have a sports massage? BEFORE THE EVENT Most people find scheduling appointments on the lighter training days more beneficial. This is mainly because it enables the therapist to treat any specific muscular tightness allowing a couple of day’s recovery before the long training runs. 
Alternatively some runners enjoy having the massage following their longer run to allow them to maximize their training performances throughout the week. 
A day’s recovery post treatment is advisable to maximise the body’s response and recovery time. 
It is suggested that whilst people are training for a half or full marathon they receive weekly massages. It is especially important to have massage towards the build up to the longer training weeks, usually placed about 4 weeks prior to the marathon. 
It is not recommended having your first ever Sports Massage in the week prior to the event. Everybody responds very different to Sports Massage. No components should be introduced in the late stage of event preparation in fear it could hinder performance. AFTER THE EVENT It is seen to be more valuable to receive massage as soon as possible following the event. As this helps to improve the recovery rate and reduces the intensity of delayed muscle soreness (DOMS) experienced 1-3 days post marathon. 
The style of massage is different from those received before the event or in other treatment sessions as it is geared at aiding the lymphatic system in its attempt at waste removal and recovery. Therefore, the massage techniques are applied more gently and fluently. As micro 
damage to the muscle tissue occurs during longer runs and the marathon the massage will be lighter also. How often should you have a massage? I would recommend a weekly or bi-weekly massages during peak training. For those on a budget, you can still see major benefits from massage by getting one per month. And of course I always recommend pre and post event massages for half marathons and marathons because of the massive benefit you can gain.

 

What you need to look for when trying to choose a good sports massage therapist… In my opinion, a good therapist will be active, preferably a runner or at least understand and/or experience many of the injuries that they will address with clients. It is important they are able to relate to what you might be experiencing both physically and emotionally. They should also be willing to work with other sports-minded health care professionals, such as chiropractors, physios, osteopaths, podiatrists and personal trainers. TOP TIP If you want to get a pre-race, deep tissue massage to loosen up your muscles, do it at least a week before your half/marathon. A deep tissue massage can have the effect of a hard workout on your muscles, so you don’t want to do it too close to the race.

SPECIAL OFFER 2014

(i)  COURSE of 4x 30 minute MASSAGES  @ £96 ( SAVE 20%)
(ii) COURSE of 8x 30 minute MASSAGES @ £180 ( SAVE 25%)

We are offering an exclusive massage offer until 30th April 2014 – specifically but not solely aimed to help Half Marathon and Marathon runners with pre and post treatment.

* Courses can be booked from 1st February 2014
* Treatments can be shared with partners/friends
* All treatments must be used by 30/04/2014
MARATHON RUNNERS
This is also a perfect opportunity for you to add a regular Sports Massage into your training programme in the lead up to & after the marathon – PRE/POST EVENT MASSAGE. Reap the benefits of sports massage!

See you at the start line – INJURY FREE Learnt, Practiced and Written By…          Natalie Harris Half Marathon Race Number 9164 Sports Therapist, Massage Therapist & Personal Trainer at Coast Chiropractic Clinic. 

Representing the Chinese part of the team here at Coast, I thought I would wish you all a Happy Chinese New Year!

In Chinese five element theory – horse is a Fire animal and 2014 is a year of the Wood Horse, sochinese_new_year_2014_year_of_the_horse_c2 expect this year to be a bit of a wild ride, as the flames of fire are fuelled  by woods fuel.

Horses allow people to travel quickly to their destination and are a symbol of travelling and speedy success. All this fire, passion and movement will ensure we have a busy schedule for 2014 with lots to do socially, romantically and at work.

On a global scale the flames will create lots of activity and chaos especially over summer, and the Wood element will mean people stick to their principles and ideals. This sets the stage for conflict and extremes as the middle ground disappears.

Personally, this fast flowing horse energy can take us into intuitive  situations as the free spirited, wild, independent horse energy creates opportunities to be had. Simply put, If it feels right, then act fast and seize the day in this horse year!

So on that note, we would like to offer:

Half Price Acupuncture treatments for new patients who make an appointment by February 11th

So if something has been bothering you and you have been thinking about resolving that problem, then now is the time! Call the clinic 01273 321133. Carpe Diem!

Written by Jeremy Marshall

Tai chi is at last coming to Coast! Hurray! There will be a FREE CLASS on Tuesday October 15th between 7-8pm and then a 6 week beginner course will begin the week after that.

            This course is about teaching the principles and exercises that form the basis of Tai chi. But what is Tai chi exactly I hear you ask? Well, Tai chi, or more correctly Tai ji quan means grand ultimate fist, or something similar, and is an “internal” martial art from China. Internal means its based on developing a soft integrated energetic body.

            Tai chi is itself philosophy in action following the infamous yin yang symbol in its movements and fighting methods. Essentially soft internal styles like tai ji dont rely on strength for success but on training the ability to connect, follow  and divert or return an opponents energy. ie also known as going with the flow. If something is coming towards you, you must go with it until it naturally runs its course, (yin) and then you can return the energy once the conditions are right (yang). Trying to force something when it ain`t the right moment generally doesn`t work last time I tried it. ie Tai chi is about following the natural laws of the universe.

            Thus the training of tai chi mind and body  has a major effect on your daily life as we engage with the yin and yang of situations beyond our control. Like I said, this stuff is deep.

            But this class has nothing to do with fighting or the martial arts and everything to do with good health, posture, letting go and gaining a sense of your bodies energy and stillness. So if you`v e ever wondered what Tai chi was all about, now is the time to come and check it out!

            Book now as spaces are limited by calling the clinic on 01273 321133!

Written by Jeremy Marshall

We had a great time this past week end at Brunswick Fair. Met loads of new people but also saw a lot of familiar faces; really nice to catch-up.

Here are some pics of Richard Clements, Osteopath and Andrew Robson, Chiropractor at work ( none of me, darn – what a pity!).

Andrew - telling it like it is at Brunswick Fair

Andrew – telling it like it is at Brunswick Fair

 

Free spine check anyone?

Free spine check anyone?

Richard explaining - the elbows connected to the...
Richard explaining – the elbows connected to the…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

United we stand.

United we stand.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Love the last pic as it shows the mindset of Coast. Chiropractor or Osteopath – the patients preference comes first.

 

Hope you are all having a wonderful summer.

Anne French

 

 

 

 

 

 

We will once again be offering FREE express road side massage and stretch aid to all Brighton Marathon runners on the day of the marathon.  We are perfectly placed along the course, just before mile 18.

Natalie, Sports Therapist and myself, Chiropractor, will be set up outside Coast Chiropractic at 198, Church Road (weather permitting, if not we’ll be just inside). Please come and see us if you’re struggling and hopefully we can help you get through the rest of the race, with a smile on your face.

We will also be available for post event treatments during normal clinic opening hours from Monday 15th April!

GOOD LUCK & ENJOY !

If you would like to look at any of our blogs on running – just click on any of the following:

Running injuries

Beginner, serious enthusiast or elite athlete

An Athletes Relief Aid

My little runaway

Yoga stretches for runners (and everyone)

Distance running and ITB syndrome

Please tell your friends and spread the word…

Running the Marathon? You may need some help…

runners-injuries

With the Brighton Marathon just around the corner, here is an insight into the types of injuries you may come across and some top tips on how to avoid them…

 

Here are some common causes of injuries while training…

Over-training

Runners often focus on endurance and stamina work rather than overall strengthening of the entire lower body. The first indicator of over training is aches and pains. When a patient presents with aches and pains, its best to deal with it sooner than later. If caught early, one to two days of rest is usually all that is needed. But, aches and pains that are ignored can become more significant. The tissues break down and can become an injury if not addressed promptly, it can then take weeks to resolve the issue.

Abrupt changes in training

Adding five miles to that daily run or altering the pace are actually abrupt changes in regimen that can spark an injury. It will become worse if symptoms start and a runner tries to work through it.

Poor footwear

Old, worn out trainers wont offer the support you need to be pounding the streets and the wrong size shoe can cause issues too. Too small and you’ll suffer with blisters, too big and it increases the lever arm so force through the calf muscles are increased and the Achilles Tendon can break down. Running shoes should ideally be changed every 350-500 miles depending on body type and training style.

Muscle imbalance

The most common cause of injury among runners is an imbalance with the muscles. Training should go beyond running and should certainly include strengthening and stretching work. Muscles can become tight and over active while others can become weak and underactive – this can cause major problems down the line whether it is to those specific muscles or to others in the same chain. For example weak gluteal muscles can cause problems at the knees, shins and ankles!

Here are some common areas of the body that are likely to come under strain during your training…

Hip Flexors

Anterior_Hip_Flexes_2The hip flexors are a group of muscles that pull the knees upwards towards the core. They begin in the lumber region of the back and connect into the femur (thigh bone). The hip flexor muscles can become inflamed or can even rupture. Hernia’s, trapped nerves and inflammation and rupture of the adductor muscles cannot be ruled out in this area either.

Inflammation

Symptoms can include pain in the groin when you lift your knee to your chest, tightness or swelling in the groin and pain may disappear when training but return afterwards.

The best way to treat inflammation is to rest until the pain has gone. Applying heat to the area will also help.

Rupture

Symptoms include a sudden, sharp pain in the groin, weakness in the area and pain when lifting the knee to your chest. If you think you may have ruptured your hip flexors, you should cease training immediately, applying ice and pressure to the area. Rehabilitation will include lots of rest, a gradual and progressive stretching and strengthening program. A complete rupture of the muscle is rare and would usually require surgery.

Anterior Knee Pain

knee-ligamentsKnee pain can arise from a range of conditions affecting the front of the knee. The knee is made up of 2 bones and the kneecap where various ligaments, muscles and tendons surround it to keep it in place. There are some common causes of knee pain for runners: softening of the cartilage on the back of the kneecap; over pronation (the way your foot strikes the ground when you run doesn’t allow shock to be absorbed properly); stiff hip joints; tight hamstring, calf and quad muscles or lack of strength in the quad muscles.

Symptoms of anterior knee pain can include pain along the medial side or just below the kneecap that gets worse when using stairs or going up/down hills. It can be worse with prolonged sitting and can be described as a dull ache. Sometimes people describe a cracking or grating of the knee and suggest it can ‘catch’ or feel like it ‘gives way’.

Immediate treatment consists of ice and rest and rehabilitation will include stretching the major muscles in the leg to decrease pressure on the kneecap and strengthening muscles to help the kneecap glide correctly.

‘Shin Splints’

Shin pain is very common in runners and it is often referred to as ‘shin splints’. However this is a very generalised term and there are 'shin splints'several different conditions that can cause this pain. Knowing the cause is most important for treatment. Causes include medial tibial stress syndrome, tibial stress fracture, chronic compartment syndrome, calf strains, nerve compression and referred back pain.

 

Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome (MTSS)

This is pain on the inside of the tibia bone bought on by running and can take hours/days to ease. It is often associated with over pronation of the foot when running meaning that shock isn’t absorbed properly. It can also be linked to continually running on hard surfaces or wearing worn out or wrong running shoes. Treatment involves rest from running as well as stretching and massage of calf and shin muscles. Correct footwear will need to be looked at and a review of training programmes to see if anything could make the condition worse.

Tibial Stress Fracture

With a tibial stress fracture, runners will often suffer pain after running however the pain normally gets worse and can last longer after each run. Runners may also suffer from a sharp rising pain when they’re in bed at night and can have tenderness over the area on the tibia. Stress fractures can be caused my repetitive loading of the bones and they are more common in women. A stress fracture can be confirmed by an x-ray and rest of 6-8 weeks from running is essential. A review of training programmes again is essential and a rehabilitation programme is vital to return to running.

Chronic Compartment Syndrome (CCS)

Chronic compartment syndrome is a pain in the lower leg muscles whilst running. The pain eases with rest and can often feel like cramp or a tight, burning sensation. CCS can be caused by leg muscles increasing in size thus becoming too big for the surrounding tissues. The surrounding tissues aren’t flexible enough to accommodate the increase in size and this causes increased pressure which can lead to nerve damage and reduced blood flow in the muscles. On examination a doctor or sports injury specialist may not find a problem because CCS only occurs during exercise. Rest will ease the pain but it will more than likely return when you start training again. If this is the case, surgery is often required.

Achilles Tendon

achilles-tendonAchilles tendon problems are another common complaint amongst runners.  The Achilles tendon connects the gastrocnemius (calf muscle) to the heel bone. The Achilles tendon can become inflamed (tendonitis) or it can be strained or ruptured.

Tendonitis

Tendonitis is the inflammation of the Achilles tendon usually due to overuse or from an injury to the Achilles. Achilles tendonitis can often be painful at the beginning of exercise and often ease during exercise. The pain usually presents as a dull ache again after exercise. Treatment involves resting, stretching and strengthening and adapting your training programme. Not over-training is key. Introduce new exercise slowly to allow your body time to adjust. Wearing the right type of footwear can be important, flat-footed shoes can put more strain on your Achilles. Allow for a proper warm up and try to vary your training programme.

Strains or ruptures

Strains and ruptures are the most common Achilles injuries. They occur when you make a sudden movement or overstretch the tendon – usually when jumping, lunging or falling. Sometimes these injuries can make it hard to walk or put your foot on the floor. Symptoms include immediate pain just above the heel turning to a dull ache, limited movement of the ankle and swelling or heat around the Achilles. Treatment will depend on the severity of strain or rupture but rest, ice and elevate is your first port of call. Rehabilitation will include stretching and strengthening.

If you are in need of help whether it is to just diagnosis your condition or to receive treatment and training advice then please give us a call. If you are ever unsure- always contact a Sports Injury Specialist or GP.

Written by  Natalie Harris – BSc Sports Therapist, MSST

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01273 321133
Tuesday: 10am - 7pm, Wednesday: 2.30pm - 6.30pm, Friday: 3pm - 7pm, Sat: 9am - 1pm